Go Live Checklist

Updated Jul 18, 2019

Before you can launch ScreenSteps to the world, you'll want to make sure everything is in order. Use this checklist to confirm you've taken care of all the major details.

Will you be sending users to a ScreenSteps published site?

ScreenSteps comes with the option to publish to a site (i.e. knowledge base) that your end users can visit. You also have the option to author content in ScreenSteps and push it out to another service (e.g. using the API or publishing to Zendesk).

The checklist you follow will depend on how you plan on using ScreenSteps.

Is the site you are launching Public or Private?

If you want anybody to be able to view your knowledge management system, then you are launching a Public site. If you want to control who views your knowledge management system, then you are launching a Private site.

Do you want to import existing content from Word/PowerPoint/wiki?

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

If you already have content in Word, PowerPoint, Clarify, or in another online wiki, you can bring that content into ScreenSteps.

  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word docs (between one to three pages of tutorials).
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word manuals (when you have Word docs that have a lot of pages of content),
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Clarify docs.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your online wiki content.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in PowerPoint or including videos.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Did you want to use Single Sign-on?

Will this knowledge management system be for customers or employees?

Do you want to import existing content from Word/PowerPoint/wiki?

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

If you already have content in Word, PowerPoint, Clarify, or in another online wiki, you can bring that content into ScreenSteps.

  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word docs (between one to three pages of tutorials).
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word manuals (when you have Word docs that have a lot of pages of content),
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Clarify docs.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your online wiki content.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in PowerPoint or including videos.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

Click here for instructions on setting up single sign-on.

The Chrome Browser Extension makes it easy for your end users to search for your ScreenSteps articles and it also gives you the option of creating contextual help.

Click here for instructions on installing the Chrome Browser Extension.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

Click here for instructions on setting up single sign-on.

The Chrome Browser Extension makes it easy for your end users to search for your ScreenSteps articles and it also gives you the option of creating contextual help.

Click here for instructions on installing the Chrome Browser Extension.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Do you want to import existing content from Word/PowerPoint/wiki?

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

If you already have content in Word, PowerPoint, Clarify, or in another online wiki, you can bring that content into ScreenSteps.

  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word docs (between one to three pages of tutorials).
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word manuals (when you have Word docs that have a lot of pages of content),
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Clarify docs.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your online wiki content.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in PowerPoint or including videos.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

Click here for instructions on setting up single sign-on.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

Click here for instructions on setting up single sign-on.

The Chrome Browser Extension makes it easy for your end users to search for your ScreenSteps articles and it also gives you the option of creating contextual help.

Click here for instructions on installing the Chrome Browser Extension.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Will this knowledge management system be for customers or employees?

Do you want to import existing content from Word/PowerPoint/wiki?

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

If you already have content in Word, PowerPoint, Clarify, or in another online wiki, you can bring that content into ScreenSteps.

  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word docs (between one to three pages of tutorials).
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word manuals (when you have Word docs that have a lot of pages of content),
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Clarify docs.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your online wiki content.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in PowerPoint or including videos.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

You will need to add user accounts so that people can view your private knowledge base. You can either add users one-by-one or you can add them by uploading a list of users.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

The Chrome Browser Extension makes it easy for your end users to search for your ScreenSteps articles and it also gives you the option of creating contextual help.

Click here for instructions on installing the Chrome Browser Extension.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

You will need to add user accounts so that people can view your private knowledge base. You can either add users one-by-one or you can add them by uploading a list of users.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

The Chrome Browser Extension makes it easy for your end users to search for your ScreenSteps articles and it also gives you the option of creating contextual help.

Click here for instructions on installing the Chrome Browser Extension.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Do you want to import existing content from Word/PowerPoint/wiki?

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

If you already have content in Word, PowerPoint, Clarify, or in another online wiki, you can bring that content into ScreenSteps.

  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word docs (between one to three pages of tutorials).
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Word manuals (when you have Word docs that have a lot of pages of content),
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your Clarify docs.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in your online wiki content.
  • Click here for instructions on bringing in PowerPoint or including videos.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

You will need to add user accounts so that people can view your private knowledge base. You can either add users one-by-one or you can add them by uploading a list of users.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Complete this checklist before launching ScreenSteps

A site is another way of saying knowledge base. In your ScreenSteps account, you can create one or more sites.

When you signed up for an account, a site was automatically created for you––so you may not need to do anything for this checklist item (yay!).

If you need to create a site, follow these instructions to do so.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

ScreenSteps organizes your content in the following way: Sites > Categories > Manuals > Chapters > Articles.

That can be a little intimidating if you're used to just authoring content in Word and saving it to a folder. So, we recommend you check out some of our resources for organizing your ScreenSteps content:

Your knowledge base is what end-users will view when they are looking for your documentation. You can make basic customizations to how it looks or you can add HTML, CSS, and javascript to customize your knowledge base's appearance.

Click here for instructions on customizing your knowledge base.

When you create a ScreenSteps account, the URL includes .screenstepslive.com in it. For example, if your account name is stark, then the URL your end users would visit to see your knowledge base would be stark.screenstepslive.com.

You can create a custom subdomain so that the URL to your knowledge base is help.stark.com. Click here for instructions on setting up a custom subdomain.

In ScreenSteps, you can set up viewer groups and assign users to those viewer groups. This will give you the option of restricting viewing privileges to specific articles, chapters, or entire manuals.

Click here for instructions on creating a viewing group.

You will need to add user accounts so that people can view your private knowledge base. You can either add users one-by-one or you can add them by uploading a list of users.

  • Click here for instructions on adding users one-by-one. Make sure to select Readers or Learners.
  • Click here for instructions on adding users in bulk using a CSV file.

Courses are a great option for end users to learn how to use your system(s) when they are ready.

Click here for instructions on creating courses in ScreenSteps.

Even though ScreenSteps creates an online knowledge management system, some of your end users may still want a PDF version of the documentation. ScreenSteps can automatically generate PDF documents and make them available to your end users.

Click here to set up your PDF download.

Here are a few additional settings you can check before you launch your knowledge base:

Will you be publishing to Zendesk?

Do you have existing content in Zendesk?

Follow this checklist for setting up ScreenSteps with Zendesk

Download this checklist to reference later.

ScreenSteps has a built-in integration with Zendesk so that you can use the ScreenSteps authoring tools and features, and publish directly to your Zendesk help portal.

Click here for instructions on creating a Zendesk integration.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal and pushed to Zendesk.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for editing your existing Zendesk articles and creating new articles from scratch (which are then published right to Zendesk). You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

Follow this checklist for setting up ScreenSteps with Zendesk

Download this checklist to reference later on.

ScreenSteps has a built-in integration with Zendesk so that you can use the ScreenSteps authoring tools and features, and publish directly to your Zendesk help portal.

Click here for instructions on creating a Zendesk integration.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal and pushed to Zendesk.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

Follow this checklist for using the API

Download the PDF to reference later on.

To use the API, it is expected that you are familiar with programming and can read through API documentation.

Click here for an overview of the ScreenSteps API.

Click here for example requests and responses.

Click here to learn about how to create Manuals, Chapters, and Articles via the API.

Click here to learn about updating article content through the API.

ScreenSteps comes with a Desktop Editor that is a word processor specifically designed for authoring technical training documentation. When you publish content with the Desktop Editor it automatically gets uploaded to the ScreenSteps web portal and pushed to your external service.

Click here for instructions on downloading the desktop editor.

ScreenSteps comes with two options for creating (and editing) articles. You can either use the Web Editor or use the Desktop Editor.

The main benefit of using the Desktop Editor is that it allows you to grab new screenshots and annotate them right within the editor. There is no need to use other apps (Snagit, Snippet, etc.) to get screenshots if you use the Desktop Editor, so the time you spend authoring content decreases significantly.

  1. Click here for instructions on using the web editor.
  2. Click here for instructions on using the desktop editor.

You can collaborate with multiple authors in ScreenSteps.

Click here for instructions on adding team members. Make sure to select Admin or Editor if you want your team to be able to author content.

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